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General Interest and Information

    An Oceans and Atmosphere Quiz Can be Found at the bottom of this page

    NOAA Central Library - The mission of the NOAA Library and Information Services (LISD) is to ensure the delivery of scientific, technical, and legislative information to users. The library's users include NOAA staff, general public, academia, industry, and other government agencies. Services are provided by telephone, inter-office mail, FAX, US mail, e-mail, and express service or special courier (for rush requests). The library contains information on other libraries noted for Atmospheric Sciences, Oceanography, Fisheries Biology, and Coastal Systems.
    www.lib.noaa.gov

    Student Research Participation Program - This web site provides opportunities for students to participate in research and development related to science, math and engineering. It is for both undergraduate and graduate students and the opportunities are available in the Washington area and in NOAA field centers.
    www.orau.gov/orise/Educ.htm

    NOAA Photo Library - The NOAA collection spans centuries of time and much of the natural world from the center of the Earth to the surface of the Sun. NOAA is descended from the oldest physical science agencies in the United States Federal Government including the Coast Survey (1807), Weather Service (1870) and Fish Commission (1871). Today, NOAA carries on the work begun by these agencies. Because of this broad base of scientific expertise and the geographic range under which NOAA science and observations are conducted, the NOAA collection includes thousands of weather and space images, hundreds of images of our shores and coastal seas, and thousands of marine species images ranging from the great whales to the most minute plankton.
    www.photolib.noaa.gov

    NOAA History
    The NOAA History site is the result of the work of many individuals throughout NOAA who have been inspired by the work of the ancestor agencies of NOAA. These agencies loomed large in the formation of the American science community as it exists today and not incidentally were and continue to be responsible for the saving of thousands of lives through warnings, forecasts, charts, and other products that help American citizens every day. NOAA and its ancestor organizations have had an enormous economic impact on our Nation. Mariners and aircraft pilots have moved trillions of tons of cargo and millions of passengers through our sea ports and airports by navigating with NOAA charts; thousands of daily operational decisions by managers and supervisors have been and are presently made on the basis of weather forecasts; and the assessment, monitoring, and conservation of our American fisheries is the result of NOAA science.
    www.history.noaa.gov

    NOAA's Quick List of Web Sites- Here are some pages that will provide you with quick access to NOAA products, data and information. Among the topics you can investigate: surveying and mapping, the earth, the ocean, atmospheric and space sciences, and the latest solar image.

    Surveying and Mapping
    http://www.noaa.gov/survey.html

    Topography
    http://www.noaa.gov/topography.html

    Floods
    http://www.noaa.gov/floods.html

    River Forecast Centers
    http://www.noaa.gov/nwsrfc.html

    Ozone
    http://www.noaa.gov/ozone.html

    Atmospheric Modeling and Mapping
    http://www.noaa.gov/modeling.html

    Geomagnetics
    http://www.noaa.gov/geomagnetics.html

    Geothermal
    http://www.noaa.gov/geothermal.html

    Natural Hazards
    http://www.noaa.gov/hazards.html

    Land Gravity
    http://www.noaa.gov/landgravity.html

    Precipitation
    http://www.noaa.gov/precipitation.html

    Radiation
    http://www.noaa.gov/radiation.html

    Solar and Space
    http://www.noaa.gov/solar.html

    The JASON Foundation - The Mission of The JASON Foundation for Education is to excite and engage students in science and technology, and to motivate and provide professional development for their teachers through the use of advanced interactive telecommunications. The foundation enjoys the support of partners who are committed to improvement of science and technical education for all students. JASON expeditions feature live, interactive broadcasts from distinctive sites on our planet through advanced technologies in robotics, fiber optics, television production, computer science, mechanical and electrical engineering, and satellite communications. (This is a not a U.S. Government website. NOAA is not responsible for the content of external internet sites).
    http://www.jasonproject.org

    Web Activities Using Scientific Data - (Grades 6-12 and Adult Guide) Learn to explore the Web using Browser tools and do scientific analysis using data from government and university sources. This is the Web version of the popular Internet Activities Using Scientific Data produced by the Space Environment Center and its education partners. - June 1998
    http://www.sec.noaa.gov/Activities/index.html

    Septic Education Made Simple - In the United States, over one-third of the population treats its sewage with an on-site septic system. Are you interested in setting up a septic education program in your community? The Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, located in the state of Washington, developed the kit, with funding and technical assistance from NOAA and the Washington Department of Ecology. The kit was produced because failing septic systems can have severe health, environmental, and economic impacts on communities, especially along the coast. This is one of the most innovative and comprehensive adult education curriculums on septic systems in the country. The Septic Education Kit includes user-friendly fact sheets that can be fine-tuned for any community.
    www.ocrm.nos.noaa.gov/nerr/septickit/">


    External Links - This category has been established to offer readers links to external sources of educational information which are related to NOAA's sciences. These links do not imply any endorsement of the company or organization, or its products or services.

    The Ocean Report - SeaWeb and KIDSNET have produced this interactive online study guide for grades 4-8. The guide features "The Ocean Report," a series of 90-second radio programs that educate listeners about a variety of issues surrounding the ocean, the life within it, and its relationship to humans. The guide includes a searchable database of the radio programs, including audio files, background information, discussion questions, and activity ideas based on the science curriculum standards. (This is a not a U.S. Government website. NOAA is not responsible for the content of external internet sites).
    www.kidsnet.org/seaweb

    Adventures of the Flood Zone Kids - This site from Bankers Insurance Group in St. Petersburg, Florida has been designed to help kids understand floods and flooding. (This is a not a U.S. Government website. NOAA is not responsible for the content of external internet sites).
    www.floodfacts.com/floodzone_kids_home.html

    Pacific Bell - Knowledge Network Explorer - Pacific Bell has made a long term commitment to improving education in California. The Knowledge Network Explorer is the official web site of Pacific Bell's education program, Education First, and supports education by helping schools, libraries, and colleges acquire and effectively use Internet and videoconferencing technology. The mission is to support meaningful technology-infusion that encourages a yearning for learning. The most popular applications include Blue Web'n site library, Filamentality Web activity builder, the Black History series, Six Paths to China Web activities, Eyes on Art, and Grant Resource Opportunities. (This is a not a U.S. Government website. NOAA is not responsible for the content of external internet sites).
    www.kn.pacbell.com/wired/bluewebn/categories.html#Scienc

    The Experiment of the Week - Robert Krampf's Science Education Company - In addition to presenting his science shows, educator Robert Krampf also shows people that science can be fun and understandable. Part of that effort is his Free Experiment of the Week list. If you join the Experiment of the Week List, each week you will get a new experiment that you can try yourself. (This is a not a U.S. Government website. NOAA is not responsible for the content of external internet sites).
    www.krampf.com/news.htm

    Welcome to NEWTON BBS - This bulletin board service has a special section entitled Ask a Scientist Service, which is for K-12 eductors and their students. The site also contains the Newton's Teacher, Classroom and Curriculum Support which has links to other pages of interest to teachers.
    www.newton.dep.anl.gov

    How the Weather Works - Home Page - The Weatherworks pages will provide informaiton about educational services and activities, WWW links, teacher courses, weather FAQs, and school-to-school weather projects, including National SKY AWARENESS WEEK. (This is a not a U.S. Government website. NOAA is not responsible for the content of external internet sites).
    www.weatherworks.com

    Colleges and Universities with Degree Programs in the Atmospheric, Oceanic, Hydrologic, and Related Sciences - This compilation is provided for those individuals interested in pursuing a career in these sciences. The information provided by the schools listed, where complete, includes the college/university name, address, department offering the degree(s) with phone numbers, specific degrees offered, and home page information. (This is a not a U.S. Government website. NOAA is not responsible for the content of external internet sites).
    www.ametsoc.org/AMS/amsedu/96degree.html

    The USA Today Weather Page - How the Weather Works - This page provides graphics and text that examine various weather phenomena, including the basics of things such as winds, what goes on in thunderstorms, tornadoes or hurricanes, or how dust from the Sahara Desert sometimes crosses the Atlantic Ocean. (This is a not a U.S. Government website. NOAA is not responsible for the content of external internet sites).
    www.usatoday.com/weather/wworks0.htm

    The University of Illinois Online Guides - The WW2010 Online Guides (formerly known as the Guide to Meteorology). These guides include resources on meteorology, climate, remote sensing and global change. These topics are presented not as individual sciences, but as integral components of a much larger system that affects the planet on which we live. Available Online Guides include Meteorology, Remote Sensing, Reading and Interpreting Weather Maps, and Projects & Activities. These curriculum aids provide teachers with a blueprint for integrating web-based educational resources into the classroom. (This is a not a U.S. Government website. NOAA is not responsible for the content of external internet sites).
    ww2010.atmos.uiuc.edu/(Gh)/guides/home.rxmlm

    The Societal Aspects of Weather - The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research is a consortium of universities that educate scientists and pursue research to enrich our understanding of the earth systems. This page provides information from studies of environmental change on topics including tornadoes, summer and winter weather, lightning, and El Niño and La Niña. (This is a not a U.S. Government website. NOAA is not responsible for the content of external internet sites).
    sciencepolicy.colorado.edu/socasp

    The Automated Weather System Helps Teach Weather in the Classroom - The award-winning AWS School WeatherNet Program promotes technological literacy and develops the higher-order thinking skills necessary for students of all grade levels to succeed in the Information Age. The AWS WeatherNet Classroom is a unique, online exploratory classroom customized for each school. Currently used in more than 6,000 schools nationwide, it is designed by educators and meteorologists to meet the needs of students and teachers who seek to make the most of the Internet experience in their classrooms or at home. The most amazing feature of WeatherNet Classroom is the ability to include current, local and national weather into the teacher's lessons! (This is a not a U.S. Government website. NOAA is not responsible for the content of external internet sites).
    www.aws.com/aws_2001/default.asp

    * * * An Oceans and Atmosphere Quiz * * *

    1. After the National Weather Service issues a hurricane warning for your town, which of these would NOT be a good idea?
    a. Have flashlights and extra batteries on hand.
    b. Brave the storm on your boat in the ocean.
    c. Stay inside, try to secure windows and doors, and have a water supply that could last a few days.
    d. Secure or take inside any loose objects that are outside to prevent them from blowing away.

    2. All thunderstorms create lightning and are dangerous. Which statement is CORRECT?
    a. If you are outside during a thunderstorm, you should take shelter underneath the nearest tree.
    b. You may get electrocuted if you touch a person who has just been struck by lightning.
    c. When you first hear thunder, you can wait to seek shelter until it starts raining.
    d. A lightning current can travel to a human who is touching an object that has been struck, like a tall tree, fence, or pole.

    3. All El Niño events are the same.
    a. True
    b. False

    4. Which of the following elements is NOT a characteristic of climate?
    a. Precipitation
    b. Sunshine
    c. Temperature
    d. Humidity
    e. Tides

    5. _______________ refers to an overall increase in the temperature of the Earth and climate changes resulting from increases in the amounts of greenhouse gases (such as carbon dioxide, methane, and water) in the atmosphere.
    a. Tropospheric aerosols
    b. Solar radioactivity
    c. Global warming
    d. Ozone depletion

    6. Whales and dolphins are mammals.
    a. True
    b. False

    7. NOAA has an environmental satellite system that is made up of two types of satellites: geostationary operational environmental satellites (GOES) and polar-orbiting environmental satellites (POES). These satellites collect data that are used for:
    a. Ocean and boating activities and safety
    b. Weather forecasting
    c. Detecting forest fires
    d. Ocean dynamics research
    e. All of the above

    8. Most shark attacks on humans occur because the sharks mistake humans for food, such as a seal or sea lion, not because sharks are vicious man-eaters. Which of these choices is INCORRECT when dealing with avoiding a shark attack?
    a. Swim with a group of people and avoid swimming alone.
    b. Do not swim near steep drop-offs or sandbars since sharks tend to congregate in these types of areas.
    c. Splash around as much as you possibly can to scare sharks away.
    d. Do not wear shiny clothing or jewelry because sharks see contrast very well and may mistake the shiny item as the scales on a fish.

    9. Humidity is a measure of how much water vapor is present in the air.
    a. True
    b. False

    10. What are some threats to coral reefs today?
    a. Global warming
    b. Over-fishing of reef species
    c. Marine pollution
    d. Coastal development
    e. All of the above

    11. This gas forms a layer, which is found high up in our atmosphere. It is a molecule made up of three oxygen atoms and protects us from the Sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation by absorbing it. What is it?
    a. Ozone
    b. Oxygen
    c. Hydrogen
    d. Nitrogen

    12. The process by which plants use the Sun’s rays to turn carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates they use for food and energy, and oxygen that we breathe is called:
    a. Respiration
    b. Precipitation
    c. Photosynthesis
    d. Evaporation

    * * * The Answers to the Oceans and Atmosphere Quiz * * *

    1. After the National Weather Service issues a hurricane warning for your town, which of these would NOT be a good idea?
    b. Brave the storm on your boat in the ocean. The safest place to be during ANY storm is indoors.
    It is not safe to be on the ocean during a hurricane, as high winds create extremely rough and dangerous seas. If NOAA weather radio advises residents to evacuate, then do so and do not wait out the storm at home. If you are not advised to evacuate, stay indoors away from windows if possible, as blowing objects outside could shatter them.

    2. All thunderstorms create lightning and are dangerous. Which statement is CORRECT?
    d. A lightning current can travel to a human who is touching an object that has been struck, like a tall tree, fence, or pole.
    Lightning strikes the tallest objects. If you cannot get to shelter, crouch on the ground away from trees and other tall objects. Lightning can strike as far as ten miles away from rainfall. Most lightning deaths occur ahead of the storm because people wait too long in seeking shelter. Someone who has just been struck by lightning does not carry an electrical charge. Immediately call an ambulance and check the victim for breathing and burns.

    3. All El Niño events are the same.
    b. False.
    El Niño events do have similarities, but there are also a lot of differences. The intensity of El Niño events differs. The storms of 1972 and 1982 were very strong, whereas the storms of 1976 and 1986 were more moderate in intensity. Also the timing and duration of these events varies. Most El Niño events last about 18 months, but the 1941 and 1991 El Niños both lasted more than two years!

    4. Which of the following elements is NOT a characteristic of climate?
    e. Tides
    may affect the climate of a particular area but are not considered an element of climate.

    5. _______________ refers to an overall increase in the temperature of the Earth and climate changes resulting from increases in the amounts of greenhouse gases (such as carbon dioxide, methane, and water) in the atmosphere.
    c. Global warming

    6. Whales and dolphins are mammals.
    a. True!
    Whales and dolphins are mammals, just like humans are. Some characteristics that all mammals share are giving birth to live young, being warm-blooded, breathing air, producing milk in mammary glands, and having hair. Believe it or not, young whales do have hair, which is typically lost as adults in most species.

    7. Data from NOAA Orbiting Environmental Satellites maintain many environmental monitoring applications such as:
    e. All of the above.
    Satellites are extremely important tools that are used for observing and learning about environmental phenomena on a global scale. For example, the POES satellite system makes polar orbits of the Earth about 14.1 times a day.

    8. Most shark attacks on humans occur because the sharks mistake humans for food, such as a seal or sea lion, not because sharks are vicious man-eaters. Which of these choices is INCORRECT when dealing with avoiding a shark attack?
    c. Splash around as much as you possibly can to scare sharks away.
    A swimmer should avoid splashing a lot and bringing pets into the water since sharks are attracted to erratic movements, thinking prey may be nearby. Sharks’ victims are usually lone animals that are perhaps sick or have gotten away from a group. That’s why it’s important to swim with a group of people rather than alone. Sharks can see contrast very well, so it is smart not to wear shiny jewelry and bright clothing into the water.

    9. Humidity is a measure of how much water vapor is present in the air.
    a. True.
    The air in our atmosphere contains a lot of water, which exists in three possible states: as water vapor, as liquid droplets (which can sometimes be frozen), and as cloud droplets (which can also be frozen ice crystals). Did you know that warm air holds more water vapor than cold air?

    10. What are some threats to coral reefs today?
    e. All of the above.
    Coral reefs only cover about 0.2 % of the world’s oceans and yet contain one-third of the world’s species of marine fish and tens of thousands of other marine species. Unfortunately humans are having a negative impact on coral reefs. Increases in carbon dioxide in the air due to greenhouse gas emissions are leading to increases in ocean temperatures, causing episodes called coral bleaching, which is when corals become stressed and expel the symbiotic algae living inside them which they need for nutrition. Other activities such as over-fishing and physical destruction of reefs decrease the amount of diversity within reefs. Coastal development often creates runoff from the land, adding to marine pollution.

    11. This gas forms a layer, which is found high up in our atmosphere. It is a molecule made up of three oxygen atoms and protects us from the Sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation by absorbing it. What is it?
    a. Ozone.
    The ozone layer is found high up in the stratosphere, and it protects all living creatures from the harmful UV rays produced by the sun. Unfortunately, humans are damaging the ozone layer by releasing CFC’s (chlorofluorocarbons) into the atmosphere, which are particles found in things like spray cans, refrigerants, and insulating products. The Montreal Protocol is a global agreement that was reached in 1987 to phase out the use of chemicals that deplete the ozone layer. Many scientific agencies worldwide, including NOAA, have programs designed to study the ozone layer and make recommendations to governments and policymakers about its status.

    12. The process by which plants use the Sun’s rays to turn carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates they use for food and energy, and oxygen that we breathe, is called:
    c. Photosynthesis.
    Respiration is the taking in of oxygen and the subsequent release of carbon dioxide and water vapor into the air. Precipitation is the change of water vapor in the atmosphere to water droplets or ice particles that fall to the Earth. Evaporation is the process by which water changes its physical state from a liquid to a gas (water vapor).

    * * * How Did you Do? * * *

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December 9, 2010 3:15 PM