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Safety Tips

     

    WEATHER

    LIGHTNING AND THUNDERSTORMS

    FLOODS

    TSUNAMIS

     

     

    WEATHER

  • Weather Safety - This website provides links to a wide range of weather-related topics including dust storms, heat waves, tornadoes, hurricanes, winter storms, flash floods and floods, thunderstorms and lightning.
    http://www.nws.noaa.gov/safety.php
  • Office of Meteorology Publications - You can access safety publications on a wide range of weather-related topics including dust storms, heat waves, tornadoes, hurricanes, winter storms, flash floods and floods, thunderstorms and lightning. Other publications include A Pilot's Guide to Aviation Weather Services, Safe Boating Weather Tips, Basic Spotter's Field Guide, and the mariner's guides. Some publications are printed in Spanish and others are in pdf format.
    www.nws.noaa.gov/om/index.html
  • NOAA Weather Radio - NOAA Weather Radio...the voice of the National Weather Service. NOAA Weather Radio broadcasts National Weather Service warnings, watches, forecasts and other hazard information 24 hours a day. NOAA Weather Radio is provided as a public service by the Department of Commerce's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The NOAA Weather Radio network has more than 480 stations in the 50 states and near adjacent coastal waters, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and U.S. Pacific Territories.
    www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/index.html
  • Special Needs NOAA Weather Radio - The special-needs NOAA Weather Radio was designed to adapt to the needs of the deaf and hard-of-hearing community. The Radio can warn deaf and hard-of-hearing persons of hazardous conditions, giving them around-the-clock, up-to-the-minute weather information. The Radio is a weather alerting system that can be a lifesaver, much as the now commonly-used smoke detector with flashing light, for deaf and hard-of-hearing persons.
    http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/edu/safety/specialneeds.html

  • Severe Weather Safety - Severe weather safety information from NOAA's National Severe Storms Laboratory
    http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/edu/safety

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    LIGHTNING AND THUNDERSTORMS

  • Lightning Kills, Play it Safe Summer is the peak season for one of the nation's deadliest weather phenomena - lightning. In the United States, an average of 73 people are killed each year by lightning. That's more than the annual number of people killed by tornadoes or hurricanes. Many more people are struck but survive. However, they often report a variety of long-term, debilitating symptoms, including memory loss, attention deficits, sleep disorders, numbness, dizziness, stiffness in joints, irritability, fatigue, weakness, muscle spasms, depression, and an inability to sit for long. To learn more about lightning, be sure to check out the Quick Facts.
    www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov/

     

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    FLOODS

  • Floods ..the Awesome Power! A Preparedness Guide - This guide explains about the dangers of the primary weather-related killer in the United States. It explains how flash floods occur and how we can protect ourselves.
    www.nws.noaa.gov/om/brochures/flashfld.htm

  • Flood Safety NOAA's National Weather Service's Flood Safety Website offers information and resources about flood safety.
    http://www.nws.noaa.gov/floodsafety

     

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    TSUNAMIS

  • Frequently Asked Questions About Tsunamis - This page provides information about tsunamis. The phenomenon (pronounced “soo-nah-mee”) is a series of waves of extremely long wave length and long period generated in a body of water by an impulsive disturbance that vertically displaces the water. In the past, tsunamis were often referred to as "tidal waves," a misnomer. Tides are the result of gravitational influences of the moon, sun, and planets and tsunamis are not caused by the tides and are unrelated to them.
    www.pmel.noaa.gov/tsunami-hazard/tsunami_faqs.htm

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November 30, 2010 1:58 PM